A Glimpse into Schooling a 2E Kid – Italian Scooby Doo

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Some days are very hard when it comes to homeschooling a child who is twice-exceptional. There is the learning disability that makes quite a few things difficult. There is the anxiety that can get in the way. And then there is the high intelligence and passion that makes things so very interesting. It takes a good deal of patience and understanding to school a child like this. I feel I do a fairly good job of it because I have a so much experience homeschooling and because I had many of the same struggles when I was younger.

The youngest boy’s days look very different from the twins. They were/are fairly academic and hard workers, so their day reflects a more typical school day. The boy’s day reflects more of how an unschooler’s day might look and for him I think this works. It allows him time to follow his passions, and it is through his passions that he learns.

For instance, one of his passions for a very long time has been Scooby Doo. He loves the books, the tv show, the movies, and he knows everything about the history of Scooby Doo. Because of this passion he has been writing Scooby books for years (which he is soon going to publish online) and collecting Scooby Doo books. He has grown quite a collection, and some of his favorite books to collect are the Italian Scooby Doo books.

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Unfortunately he never has a good way to translate the books, so he could read them all the way through. Last week though he found out that Itunes was carrying the Scooby Doo Italian books to buy for the iBooks app. From there he discovered an easy way to translate them all, and within a few hours, the boy had purchased several of the books and translated them all. Then he read them all, which was quite an experience for him.

He couldn’t believe how different they all were from the American Scooby Doo. Of course he realized that some of these differences could be put down to translation, but after reading several of the books, he could tell that was not the only reason for the difference. The topics were different (including one plot dealing with plastic surgery), the personalities of the characters were different (Fred comes off as mean), and there was cussing throughout the books. The boy got such a kick out of the differences and really enjoyed reading them all.

Of course being a very passionate kid, he was not yet done in his study of Italian Scooby Doo books. He was unhappy that all the books were not available yet on iTunes, so he has been researching how to write a letter to Itunes and to the Italian publisher, so he can let them know how he feels. And he has started to write his own Scooby Doo Italian book. This book is in the style of the Italian books and includes a slightly weird plot line, the different character traits, and the occasional cuss word. When he is done he is going to translate the whole thing into Italian, so that it truly is an Italian Scooby Doo book. I can’t wait to read it!

6 thoughts on “A Glimpse into Schooling a 2E Kid – Italian Scooby Doo

  1. That is pretty amazing. Is your family bilingual ? We are a bilingual family, I am from Germany and now that we are homeschooling we can focus more on the bilingual part and it is so fun. Discovering other languages in general is so fun and such an amazing way to learn !!! Love his collection and he looks soo proud !!

    • Thanks for your comment. We are not a bilingual family, but the kids love learning other languages. It is great when a passion leads them on a path to so much learning.

  2. Pingback: A Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschool Approach for Twice-Exceptional Students | SEA Homeschoolers

  3. Pingback: A Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschool Education for Twice-Exceptional Students | TAD Town

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